Mini Hydro Schemes; threatening Sinharaja

 

In Sri Lanka large hydro power potential has been fully utilised. There is no space to add in more plus the existing schemes are multi purpose, providing necessary irrigation water especially to the semi dry and dry zones. And this places a further limit on the capacity of Sri Lanka to generate additional electricity from major H.E.P. schemes

However, there are opportunities for the development of privately owned small scale or mini hydro schemes which could add power to the national grid in Sri Lanka. The problem is that  these schemes are causing concern amongst environmentalists because they block streams and threaten the environment of fresh water fish and fragile riverine ecosystems.

The Energy situation

The Sri Lankan government has ambitious plans to achieve high rates of economic growth in the coming years. However, Sri Lanka barely generates enough energy to satisfy the demands both domestic and industrial right now. To make matters worse, existing power supply has been plagued by disruptions and power outages in the last few months.

Since coming online the thermal power station at Norochalai on the east coast has had several reported breakdowns including a fire, a leak, a trip and an instance where generation exceeded design levels, causing a shutdown. The most recent shutdown came in March when an explosion in a stepdown transformer caused an island-wide power outage.

It doesn’t help levels of confidence in the electricity generation system to read Sri Lanka’s deputy minister for power and renewable energy, Ajith Perera, saying that the plant had been built with “outdated” technologies and substandard materials.

Add in the continuing debate over whether the next thermal power station at Sampur should be built and it  is understandable that the authorities would consider  additions to the grid from  privately owned hydro electric power generation which is both clean and renewable.

Enter the mini hydroscheme

A mini hydro project works by having water in a river diverted to a powerhouse by means of a dam built across the flow. This water rotates a turbine and flows back downstream. Not all the water can be diverted: a part has to be let flow naturally in the river, according to law.

Mini-hydro-power-gra

reprinted with permission by Malaka Rodrigo

Dam-built-on-Anda-Dola-c-Rainforest-Protectors

reprinted with permission by Malaka Rodrigo

The advantages to the state seem obvious.

  • The south west of the island is an area of high rainfall so projects such as this provide a clean and renewable source of energy
  • the state is not involved in any outlay of funds but can simply opt to buy in power from the private company
  • the scale of the development is small which should minimise environmental impact

However, this form of clean energy comes at a cost;

  • alterations to the river flow have an impact  on the physical hydrology of the river changing the volume and velocity of flow downstream, changing the river load and so impacting river channel processes, often increasing erosion downstream of the dam
  • changes to the river have an ecological impact on both flora and fauna
  • there is often damage to the environment from trucks and during construction destroying pristine environments and habitats

Add to that the question of whether the state should be reliant on private companies for additional power generation when their  main motive in building these schemes is arguably profit above any other consideration, including the environment

Some tea estates up in the hills already operate their own private schemes providing power to the tea factories. Theses schemes are generally not taking place in environmentally sensitive areas and are not the focus of this article. What is of concern is applications to develop mini hydro schemes in environmentally sensitive areas such the Sinharaja rainforest reserve.

Case Study

The proposal to build a  mini hydro plant at a waterfall and beauty spot is posing a real threat to Athwelthota river; home to 39 freshwater species 19 of them endemic to Sri Lanka.

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source Youtube

The Athwelthota is one of many rivers that flows out from the northern flanks of the Sinharaja rain forest reserve in southern Sri Lanka. Sinharaja is a world heritage site, and the country’s last viable area of primary tropical rainforest. More than 60% of the trees are endemic and many of them are considered rare. There is much endemic wildlife, especially birds, but the reserve is also home to over 50% of Sri Lanka’s endemic species of mammals and butterflies, as well as many kinds of insects, reptiles and rare amphibians.

forest reserve.tiff

source Google sites

Athwelthota is a paradise for freshwater fish, with a number of species discovered in this unique habitat. The CEJ and the Wildlife Conservation Society of Galle (WCSG) have published a poster showing the indigenous fish that could be endangered by the proposed mini-hydro project in Pilithudu ella, Morapitiya-Athwelthota.

If a mini hydro plant is built, some believe that  the change in flow will be a death sentence for many species living in this micro-habitat,

  • Different fish need different micro-habitats, . For example, the gal padiya or sucker fish lives deep in fast-flowing water; some fish species live in relatively calm water while others prefer fast-flowing water.
  • But if part of a stream is diverted the habitat downstream changes and fish will be affected even though a percentage of water might be allowed to flow freely.
  • With flow changes the PH value of water too could change and very sensitive species could become affected.
  • Some fish migrate upstream to breed and when the stream is blocked this movement is disrupted,

In Athwelthota, 39 freshwater species have been recorded, 20 of them endemic to Sri Lanka.

Most of the mini-hydro projects are being constructed in the biodiversity rich wet zone, so the damage they cause is actually worse than with the large dams,  Not only the fish but other animals such as amphibians and freshwater crabs too are affected.

Athwelthota is also home to Sri Lanka’s only aquatic orchid. Near a waterfall lies a special “spray zone” full of water vapour and this special habitat could be totally lost,

Overall 37 projects are under consideration/construction; many in or on the boundaries of the Sinharaja Rain Forest Reserve.

Construction is being carried out in the Northern Sinharaja Rainforest buffer zone at Kosgulana, approximately 4km east from the Kudawa main entrance. A dam is being built blocking the Kosgulana river in Sinharaja buffer zone and several acres of rainforest have been cleared and concrete laid along the once pristine and protected riverbank. Large trucks and machinery used for construction have driven a wide track through what was once a small footpath in the Sinharaja buffer zone, between Kudawa and Kosgulana,

Another project in the rain forest where 2.5km of concrete penstock has been constructed in the Dellawa district is also said to be “causing massive environmental destruction to the stream, the wildlife and the forest The mini-hydro project will destroy a total 6.5 km stretch of the Anda Dola as water is being diverted from the weir to the powerhouse, several kilometres away. This will result in the local extinction of many endemic and endangered fish species recorded in the Anda Dola.

and what impact might this have on tourism going forward.. not everyone wants to dump themselves on a beach for two weeks…

Final thought

Sri Lanka as a country is changing. With the new government there is a greater concern for the environment and a growing resistance on the part of environmentalists to the power of local politicians and businessmen who have been allowed to ignore the environmental laws of the country. It will be interesting to see how successful they are going forward.

In any case micro hydro schemes are not the answer to Sari Lanka’s growing energy problem. Put together they will not generate the additional power needed. Neither can the island continue to afford to import large amounts of oil to generate power.

Maybe that does mean going ahead with the Sampur coal fired power station in spite of all the objections. Or maybe the government and its foreign funding partners should be looking much more seriously at wind power and solar power as alternatives rather than dumping outmoded and dirty technology on an unsuspecting population.

Acknowledgement: I am grateful, as ever, to Malaka Rodrigo for allowing me to take much of the above from his excellent article: Mini hydros; clean energy comes at a high cost to nature featured in his blog: Window to Nature

You should also read his latest blog which is a follow u on the first one at

http://www.sundaytimes.lk/160828/news/flawed-approvals-of-mini-hydro-projects-spell-river-land-destruction-206573.html

 

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Colombo Floods 2016

The South West Monsoon  hit Sri Lanka hard in 2016. The heavy rains have resulted in landslides in Kegalle and flooding in Colombo  for example, which have displaced more than 300,000 across the island with at least 58 left dead and a further 130 missing. 
Now in 2017 the monsoon season has been accompanied by large scale flooding and mudslides which have left 202 dead and 600,000 people displaced. The areas around Rathnapura and Kalutara have been badly affected but, Matara in the south of the island has also suffered serious flooding. In all the floods and landslides have destroyed 1,735 houses and damaged 9,432 while 146 schools were also damaged –
Predictably, for some it all turns out to be the government’s fault; but it isn’t.

Climate change in South Asia is a reality and one of the outcomes is that rainfall will become less predictable and the frequency of extreme rainfall events is set to increase. Sri Lanka needs to brace itself for more events like this, and do you know what? In the short run there isn’t much anyone can do about it.

The 2016 flood; what happened?

May is statistically the start of the South West Monsoon in Sri Lanka and brings rain to the South and West of the country.

As any A level geographer will tell you  (putting it simply);  the South West monsoon season is the result of a seasonal reversal in wind direction, from North East ( off the landmass) to South West (off the ocean)

This year the Indian sub-continent ( and also Sri Lanka) has been suffering big time from heatwaves which have seen the temperatures soar above 40 deg C. for weeks on end. High land temperatures vis-a-vis the ocean, create an air pressure imbalance; lower air pressure over the land higher over the ocean, an creates an airflow from the Indian Ocean on to the land masses of Sri Lanka and India. The bigger the difference in temperature and air pressure between the two the stronger the inflow of air towards the continent. Warm wet air rising over the landmass = rain.

Figure3

typical SWM situation; credit: one data.edu

But this year the monsoon has arrived with a vengeance

Why the heavy rain?

So we already have a set up whereby the winds are coming from the South-West.. from the warm ocean surface. However, you have to factor in a low pressure system that formed in the Indian Ocean to the East of the island and developed into a tropical storm which has moved northwards towards India. As it developed it set up a strong inflow of “wet” air coming off the Indian Ocean and the Island land mass forced that wet air upwards, leading to torrential rain. So this is just a sketch to give the reader an idea of what is going on, where the winds are coming from.

IMG_0833

 

image_1463542469-f07ac6cb02

satellite image of the depression

so the depression is the white blob of cloud north of Sri Lanka.It is now moving North -East. What you have to imagine is that the air flow is inward/upward and anti-clockwise reaching way back into the western Indian Ocean; those thicker cloud elements suggest more rain to come!

A note on depressions for the uninitiated

a low pressure system or depression creates an inflow of air in a broadly anti-clockwise spiral. Warm air heated from below rises.. the warmer the air the faster and higher it rises. As it rises it cools, condenses and produces cloud and rain.

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here we are interested in the diagram on the right; credit the britishgeographer

The Indian Ocean this time of year is warm in any case; but I read that the surface ocean temperature may be around 31deg C. which is way above where it should be, and that is only likely to make things worse.

Nb; This isn’t a local effect however as some seem to think, but related to global circulation patterns

So in this case very warm moist air spirals upwards. As air condenses to form water droplets it releases heat back into the rising air.. it fuels more uplift.. clouds reach up higher into the atmosphere resulting in the formation of cumulus clouds stretching high up towards the tropopause. As a rule of thumb the stronger the uplift the lower the air pressure and with it the stronger the inflow of surface winds at the base of the depression.

The net result; torrential rainfall, strong winds and violent thunderstorms.

Flooding in Colombo

According to some, the construction of the large lakes such as the Diyawanna lakes and the improvements to the canals and drainage systems was supposed to mean that Colombo would not suffer any more from floods like the 2011 flood. Maybe this was wishful thinking, however.

Colombo district will always be vulnerable to flash flooding because:

  • large areas are low lying; no more than 5 metres above sea
  • the land gradient is slight so water has nowhere to drain away
  • large areas are urbanised which reduces infiltration, and exacerbates surface flow
  • Rivers like the Kelani river flow off the west flanks of the central highlands which have been receiving high levels of precipitation. That flood water is eventually going to end up on the lowland. Colombo sits on the natural flood plain of the Kelani Ganga and the river does periodically what rivers do.. it floods especially when it is choked with sediment washing done from the central uplands.

srilanka-map

  • on top of this heavy rainfall and intense thunderstorms are common occurrences in the Colombo district

This does seem to be an extreme event, however. Over 300mm of rain fell right across the catshment, both in the upper and lower reaches ( as much as could be expected in a month)  Intense rainfall on to an urban surface had nowhere to go.

The Kelani Hydrograph

a hydrograph plots the way rivers react to an intense rainfall event. I found this one which is taken from the 2005 flood. What you can see is that the river reacts quite quickly to rainfall events.. less than 24 hours it seems:

kelani hydrograph

Points to note:

    • very steep rising limb
    • short time lag from peak rainfall to peak discharge
    • high volume of peak flow
    • gentle falling limb; flow is still high3 days later

If you study the Kelani valley in the hills where it rises you can see why it will flood downstream

Dhammika Heenpalla creative commons

credit: Dhammika Heenpalla

  • the valley is steep sided which would accelerate rainfall into the channel as surface flow and throughflow
  • the slopes are long and locally rainfall is high so a large amount of rainfall will end up in the channel very quickly
  • there is no flood plain for flood water to spread over
  • so all the floodwater is penned up in the valley unable to escape; instead thundering down to the lowland plains to the west.
Impact

It’s too early to assess the damage caused by the landslides and flooding across the island. What we do know is that over 200 families are missing  with 58 pronounced dead following landslides in the central uplands that engulfed 3 villages.

Across the island upwards of 300,000 people have been rendered temporarily homeless. The cost in terms of damage to property will become clearer as time passes. In the meantime a huge relief operation is swinging into place with the Sri Lankan armed forces at the forefront of rescue and relief efforts.

Who will be shouldering the cost?

  • More than likely the lower middle and low income groups whose homes have been engulfed or inundated.
  • In Colombo, those living in unofficial shelters next to the Kelani river, those in the low lying suburbs around Colombo;

and it is just worth thinking about what it means for a family to see their home flooded, their possessions ruined; and in the main these are families who cannot easily bear the cost of putting there home back together

Imi's housec3a63a24f545cd193e22afeebf0a38bb

My friend Imi’s house; this is the reality of flooding: putting her mother’s house back together will take way more money than they have; life is set to be difficult for sometime to come and what you need to do is multiply that by 300,000 to get an idea of what this means for a small island like Sri Lanka

We might “study” this as a hazard event BUT let’s also remember that this is very much a human tragedy.

For some stark video footage check out http://www.sundaytimes.lk  the online page and scroll down the front page to the video links.

Last thought

As with the UK a couple of years ago, when we get an extreme weather event it is almost “de rigeur” to blame the authorities for not anticipating the event and protecting against it. It seems it always has to be someone’s fault. The same appears to be happening in Sri Lanka. I saw a Sunday Times.lk  opinion piece asking; ‘why is this happening again?” Well unfortunately that is nature for you. What did people expect? That the government could simply tell the rain to go away?

Point is that we live in an increasingly hazardous world which we do not control and cannot always predict. If we choose to live in areas which can become vulnerable to hazards such as flooding and landslides we need to accept that when these extreme events occur we are at risk. That doesn’t mean that efforts should not be made to moderate the impact of these events

Given that the outcome of climate change may well mean an increase in extreme weather events (among other things) a question that might be asked is what is being done to moderate the impacts of future events

  • The meteorological department based in Colombo is already on the case; a great deal of research is already underway on a range of issue related to weather and climate and is well worth checking out: try this out: http://www.meteo.gov.lk/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=47&Itemid=200&lang=en
  • But the met office need access to much more powerful computing power and technology if the aim is to improve the forecasts
  • So knowledge is the first step but then it comes down to what the government intend to do with that knowledge. The danger could be that in the rush for economic development planning for an increasingly hazardous environment may not be a high priority.. that would be a mistake.

So what might need to be done.

  1. Seems to me  understanding where the flood water comes from is a starting point. Does the Kelani River need for its banks to be raised higher?
  2. Is there a need for engineering solutions to control/impound water in the central highlands in the event of high rainfall as for instance the Los Angeles river in southern California so that Western Province is less at risk?
  3. Can anything be done to increase the flow of floodwater from drains and canals to the sea?
  4. In the highlands is it time to re-forest the slopes of the hills to stabilise them and reduce the landslide hazard? Should geological surveys be undertaken to identify and map areas of high vulnerability
  5. Should people be moved away from dangerous locations?

All basic stuff isn’t it but that’s where the thinking needs to go; its an old saying but prevention is much better than a cure and in the long run less expensive.

The point is that this type of extreme event will happen again and again; all the predictions point in that direction. What the government needs to do now is put in place a coherent disaster management plan, with a senior minister at the helm to co-ordinate rescue and recovery and possibly to take control away from ineffective and self seeking officials and politicians who have shown that they are not up to the task.

In the follow on article i will be looking at  the relief effort, the declaration of flood areas as high security zones  and what can be done to help mitigate against future floods.

Just published; have a look also at this from CEPA

http://groundviews.org/2016/05/19/sri-lanka-floods-2016-avoiding-the-mistakes-of-2004/?platform=hootsuite

 

 

Dengue count Sri Lanka: 2017; in the grip of an epidemic

Stop Press:  Dengue Cases 2017: January – November (mid): 167,640 ( figures update monthly)

Total dengue cases 2016:  54,945 (2015: 29,777)

Note: This article has been substantially re-written

Sri Lanka recently announced it has eradicated Malaria from the island; no mean feat. So why not Dengue fever? Both are viral infections carried by mosquitoes.
Sri Lanka has ambitious investment plans to develop its economic base and to establish the Western Province (based around Colombo) as a major business hub for South Asia; see The Megapolis plan elsewhere on Geosrilanka (click here). But, has the government got its spending priorities round the wrong way. Shouldn’t improving public health come first? The cost to the country of treating dengue in Western province alone is enormous for a country struggling with financial issues. The cost of hospitalisation in the Colombo district alone in 2012 was estimated to be US$ 2.25million equal to around US$. 12.2 million for the country as a whole. The figures are large and for an emerging economy, unsustainable.

Eradicating the mosquito breeding sites should surely be a priority but it doesn’t seem to be. Instead:

  • there is no organised garbage collection, (a major source of mosquito breeding sites), and what there is, is privatised; reportedly irregular and unreliable
  • fly tipping of garbage is commonplace
  • there is an almost complete lack of regulation of buildings, companies and individuals who seem to be able to flout what laws there are re: mosquito breeding site control
  • there is not enough investment in dengue protection and prevention

Maybe what it really needs is for several high profile politicians to contract dengue or worse still dengue hemhorragic fever (DHF) ( a killer) before the government acts.

Make no mistake, the more cases of dengue there are overall the more potentially fatal cases of DHF (more than 300 this year and counting) .. that’s just basic mathematics!

But don’t think this is a health issue. Part of the economy is built on the revenue from tourism. The warning signs re tourism are beginning to go up. Just check out travel advisories. At the moment there are quite low key but they will ramp up and tourists will go elsewhere. Right now, health wise Colombo is not a great place to be at least to a potential tourist. Will foreign businesses really want to locate new offices in a country which seems incapable of dealing with this threat? Anyone who has contracted dengue will tell you; it is a very nasty disease; not just a cough/cold..and then there are related viral infections like chickungunya..

So instead of sitting on their hands is it time for the authorities to step up to the plate?

It is not any good hiding behind the fatalist statements like; dengue is endemic in the tropical world; we have to live with it; after all it isnt a killer. Sri Lanka is doing far worse than its neighbours in South East Asia; check this out:

I found these figures on a world Health Organisation Sheet; Dengue Update listing reported cases: (data up to end July 2017)

Cambodia:      535                         Lao PR:      2138                       Singapore;      1149

China :          107                        Malaysia:    43,807                      India:              18700

In an earlier article I asked the question; Is Sri Lanka winning the war against dengue? Well the place to go to get the answers is the Ministry of Health Epidemiology Unit. The answer would seem to be “absolutely not”.. take a look.

2016 was a very bad year, in fact until now the worst year on record. What made it so disappointing was that in 2015 the number of cases island wide was down to under 30,000 so there was hope that a  corner had been turned in the battle against dengue fever; but it hadn’t. The number of cases almost doubled.

Worryingly 2017 has been even worse. So far in 2017 ( up to end June ) there have been over 165,000 reported cases; already more than what was a record year in 2016. Things are getting much much worse! What it also points to is that this year (2017) the figure may well top 200,000 cases.

Sri Lanka is in the grip of a dengue epidemic

Up until 2017 an analysis of the data  shows is that the number of reported cases used go up and down; one year up the next down,see below; figures are for all Sri Lanka 2010 – 2016.

Even so, as you can see the overall trend line is up! But now in 2017, there isn’t even the respite of a dip in cases.

So where will this go if it remains unchecked: 250,000 in 2018 .. higher? Right now around 1 in 150 Sri Lankans have been infected this year. What if 250,000 cases were to be reported next year? That would be less than 1 in 100!

Dengue Hotspots
  • Colombo          31,794
  • Gampaha         29,451
  • Kandy              12,725 only 4063 cases in 2016!!
  • Ratnapura       10,743
  • Kurunegala      10,113
  • Kalutara            9,895
  • Kegalle             9,092
  • Galle                 5,629
  • Batticaloa         4,792
  • Trincomalee      4,763
  • Jaffna                4,738 (until 2009 dengue fever was virtually absent)

Thankfully the number of new cases has started to decline. So far, halfway into November, there have been less than1600 new cases reported this month. However, for Western Province the October/November inter-monsoon season is still in full flow; and that could see a secondary peak in the wetter parts of the island.  Worryingly the number of cases reported in Kandy is on the rise however. Plus the North East Monsoon will arrive in the North and North East in November and December and it remains to be seen whether this will ramp up the cases for Jaffna, Trincomalee Batticaloa and Hambantota.

  1. Western Province is by far the worst affected; 44% of all reported cases have occurred in Colombo Gampaha and Kalutara. A standout feature of the data is the massive increase in the number of cases in Gampaha; In 2016 there were 7173 cases; this year alone that figure is 29,451 to mid November!
  2. Kandy is having a bad year. Already this year the number of cases is treble 2016.
  3. And now Jaffna is becoming a hotspot; the last 3 years have shown significant increases! (only I peak here to coincide with the North-East Monsoon otherwise pretty low during the dry season when the mosquitos are less likely to be breeding.)
  • 2014       1839
  • 2015       2016
  • 2016       2468 a net % increase of 34% on 2015
  • 2017       4783 to mid November

nb; * in 2011 there were only 400 recorded cases all year;

If we assume that the number of dengue cases May to December matches 2016 then we can expect another 1400 cases. 2017 could see 5000+ cases registered in Jaffna; that is a massive increase once again.

So why is the number of cases increasing so fast in Jaffna? It seems likely that dengue has been “imported” in to Jaffna. Prior to 2009 movement in and out of Jaffna was probably quite tightly restricted  first by the Tamil Tigers and then by the Sri Lankan government; but now Jaffna is opening up. Now more and more people are visiting including a number from Colombo, and they are most likely bringing the virus with them.

Plus there is an increased amount of construction activity in the town; and construction sites are havens for breeding mosquitos.

4.  Galle is also showing an uptrend

  • 2014       1224
  • 2015       1030
  • 2016       5341
  • 2017       5583 (to end of October

nb; there were just 879 recorded cases in 2011

the disease incidence  follows the pattern of Colombo: two peaks June and January. So although the figures for Galle are lower overall, the increases over the past 4 years are worrying.

Speaking with a researcher working in the Galle area, recently,  she suggested that one of the reasons could be that the villages in the Galle area are becoming quite urbanised. Maybe it is also the case that the highway has increased the number of visitors coming from and going to Colombo

The Yo Yo effect

If you look at the number of recorded cases up to 2015 although the trend is generally upwards there was an up and down effect; a bad year followed by a slight decline next year and then an increase in cases the following year. Why would that be?

  • Studies in Singapore link  dengue outbreaks to particular temperature regimes.  As temperatures rise beyond 25deg the incubation period for the mosquito shortens.. populations grow rapidly and the feeding rate increases.  Currently the Singapore authorities use an ambient temperature of 27.8 degrees as a baseline and issue warnings when it goes above this figure..so possibly the same applies to Colombo. Relatively minor changes in ambient temperature may help to explain the variation at least in part. Research is needed to substantiate this, however.
  • Heavy rain affects the survival rate of the larvae.. they get flushed out of their breeding areas.. especially if it is continuous and prolonged. It is actually the period after the rains when there is still standing water around that the mosquitos can breed rapidly.. so an in depth analysis of rainfall patterns and  disease outbreak patterns is probably needed ( bear in mind that there is a 1 to 2 month time lag between peak rainfall and the upsurge in cases )
  • the virus itself seems to change; two serotypes in particular, of the virus appear to alternate; some years it is S1 and then after a period S1 seems to decline in impact to be replaced by S2
Since 2015, however, there has been no respite in the increase in the spread of this virus. The question is why?
Of real interest however is the report of the re-emergence of the S2 strain of the virus
The emergence of a new serotype

note: a serotype is is a distinct variation within a species of bacteria or virus

There are 4 serotypes of the dengue virus; types 1,2,3 and 4. As I understand it over time populations can develop some degree of immunity to any one strain. But, immunity to say type 1 does not give immunity to the other three types. So if a new strain or serotype of the virus emerges it is likely that the population doesn’t have an immnunity and so the number of cases surges upwards.

I found this on the facebook page of the Centre for Dengue Research based at Sri Jayawardenepura University

The sudden rise in 2009 was (the) emergence of dengue 1, the current increase is because of (the) emergence of serotype 2 which was not around for 6-7 years. (The) Question is why do serotypes suddenly appear and then disappear? The $64000 question perhaps!

Understanding the way the virus works seems to be a long way off. That makes it doubly important to control the mosquito vector by destroying it’s breeding sites.

So why isn’t this happening?

The main reasons given are all too familiar:

  • a lack of co-ordination between local authorities; between the ministries for health, environment and education; problems in enforcing anti-mosquito breeding action;
  • a lack of dengue-awareness raising programme
  • poor or non existent garbage collection and disposal
  • under-staffing of public health departments
  • general indifference on the part of the government, politicians and the public.
The Special Case of Colombo

Western Province is a major hotspot with over half of all dengue cases. Colombo  Gampaha and Kalutara now account for 44% of all cases; rising from less than 25% in 2010. There are a number of reasons why this might be; below is the graph for Colombo.

colombo-dengue

(Note: the curve for Colombo is different.. less of a yo-yo effect)

  1.  Colombo Gampaha and Kalutara  are in the Wet Zone; hot wet and humid all year the region provides the ideal climate for mosquitos to breed.
  2. The Western Province is the most densely populated and most urbanised region in the country.
  3. The aedes egypptii mosquito that carries dengue is well adapted to urban areas and thrives where there are:
  • piles of garbage left uncollected in the street
  • coconut husks and old tyres left lying around
  • well watered gardens and water pots
  • rubbish clogged canals
  • broken or poorly maintained drainage pipes and storm drain outlets
  • building sites where there is standing water, piles of rubbish and no real regulation to ensure monitoring of potential mosquito breeding sites
  • small tracts of undeveloped land which quickly become breeding sites for mosquitoes
  • untended rubbish
  • standing water
  • lack of pest control
  • a large number of nooks and crevices

3.  large areas of Colombo are high density; especially the under-served settlements. So it is quite easy for dengue to spread once it takes hold in an area.

4.  overcrowded hospitals: according to  studies carried out by the Centre for Dengue Research, hospitals have become a major source of infection; this seems crazy but the fact is that if you wanted to catch dengue fever (unlikely) hospitals are a good place to go. Why? Well they are overcrowded and dengue patients have not been routinely  isolated from the rest of the hospital. Quite often dengue patients are not even covered by a mosquito net! So a mosquito can bite an infected patient then buzz around biting doctors, nurses, visitors and other patients.

source; credit Sunday Times Sri Lanka

5.  high levels of construction activity; this is new but since 2009 when the civil war was brought to an end the  rate of new construction has increased exponentially, and construction sites provide ideal sites for mosquitos to breed especially when they are largely unregulated and where senior management of the construction companies remain either oblivious of the threat or are simply not interested in doing anything about it:

6.  Last year’s flooding would not have helped, especially as the clean up operation was slow and haphazard.

There may well be a correlation between flooding and an increase in dengue fever in specific locations; A look at the most recent map of flood affected regions may throw some light on the issue,

Much of Western Province and areas as far down as Galle suffered badly from flooding. Ratnapura for example was badly affected and its dengue figures have spiked ( already double 2016).

There are allegations that local governments and municipal councils are directly responsible for causing many of the largest mosquito breeding areas. There have been frequent protests against the creation of large uncovered garbage dumps near residential areas and the failure to clean stagnant canals, sewerage sites and other pits and potholes filled with polluted water.

Dengue Control: a critique of governance

Dengue control and prevention is a duty of the local authority. How well is that duty being carried out?

  1.  According to Dr. Pradeep Kariyawasam Former Chief Medical Officer of Health, Colombo ( “The Island” newspaper: May 2nd), the Public Health Department of the Colombo Municipal Council  should have around
  • 55 Public Health Inspectors,
  • 150 Midwives,
  • 185 Health instructors,
  • 55 Mosquito control Field Assistants, who could have been used to inspect all the premises and land parcels in the city which number around 80,000.

Unfortunately, instead of these 450 Field Officers, there are only around 180 to do this work.

He adds that in the past there was an organised control programme of fogging and spraying potential mosquito nesting sites but this programme has lapsed  “due to some unknown reason.”

“Only the interiors of houses are sprayed, when 95 % of the breeding takes place outside the four walls. The PHIs in the suburbs also have copied Colombo’s above idea, and this may be one reason why we have so many dengue mosquitoes and patients today. Even the inspections have been done only when Mosquito control weeks have been announced by the Ministry of Health”.

He goes on to explain that one of the problems was that control programs could not be started at the proper time. “The dengue mosquito’s flying range is only 100-200 metres. So if we could start our control and education programs early it would be easy to reduce casualties.”

Kariyawasam added: “The biggest problem we face is a lack of manpower as a result of not recruiting people for 10 to 15 years. We do not have a single entomological assistant. We need at least 50 public health inspectors but we have only 23 now. We have only 22 field assistants to cover the work of 75. We employ only 70 health instructors though we need 150.

“Our budget does not allow us to communicate our educative messages in the electronic media and press. TV companies charge 20,000 rupees per 15 seconds. A one-page newspaper advertisement costs 100,000 rupees. Even in the state-owned media we do not get a chance.”

2.  The situation has worsened as council services have been privatised. A resident in the Sri Jayawardanapura municipal council area told the WSWS:

“After the cleaning services were privatised, the number of sanitary workers has been further reduced and we have to keep our garbage for several days until someone comes. The spraying of insecticides for mosquitoes has been halted or curtailed. I have not seen any spraying for several months.”

3.  In a recent Daily Mirror article the paper criticised local government for not organising a  more effective clean up campaign but they also pointed out;

a.  poor management of construction sites (the Colombo Municipal Office  has issued 70 red notices  closing down building sites in contravention of mosquito control laws)

b.  workplace and school place locations have seen a noticeable increase in breeding sites

this comment from the paper: “The situation cannot be a surprise considering the deterioration of cleanliness in major towns in the recent past for which even President Maithripala Sirisena had reprimanded the relevant minister last year.”

and they add:

“The health authorities who always rightly advise the general public to remove their garbage in a regular manner do not seem to have taken note of the lethargic attitude of the local authorities who are mainly responsible for garbage disposal.”

4.  What made the whole situation worse for Colombo last year. were the floods which inundated large areas around the Kelani river in May They left behind a mess of mud, garbage and standing water which went uncleared for a significant period and which would have provided ideal breeding grounds for the mosquito to thrive.

Urgent Action Needed ( suggestions from Dr. Pradeep Kariyawasam )

1) Employ dedicated staff (2 officers with at least 2 volunteers)  for around 50-75 premises in a street, who will meet the residents, create awareness and check these same premises and lands throughout the year. They will know exactly where to look for mosquito breeding in their allocated area, as it is difficult to find the larvae which could breed in one teaspoon full of water. . This is far better than sending officers to unknown terrain to look for breeding spots which will be fruitless.

2) All vacancies for PHIs, Midwives, Health Instructors and Field Assistants should be filled immediately.

3) The stopped chemical/BTI spraying programmes should be re-started. The internal spraying should be stopped as that strategy is used in Malaria control where the mosquitoes rest inside the houses. This internal spraying will cause more harm than good as the residents will be breathing the chemicals and that could create respiratory diseases, and also the food could be contaminated.

4) The shramadana programmes of yesteryear should be re started as soon as the waste dumping issue is settled in the country. This is very important in slum and shanty areas in the city, where 60% of the city’s population live.

5) All yards and bus stands, where public transport vehicles are parked, should be fumigated and kept clear of mosquito breeding places.

Data Source

The Epidemiology unit is an excellent source of current and past data on dengue fever; you can find it at http://epid.gov.lk/web/index.php?option=com_casesanddeaths&Itemid=448&lang=en#

It isn’t so much that Sri Lanka has turned the corner in the fight against dengue.. far from it. The question really is; have the authorities even joined the fight? There are 2 articles from The Sunday Times which are quite damning of the current situation and are well worth a read.

  1.  Dengue sites need to be cleared with ‘military precision’  this one starts with this sentence; says it all “Official lethargy and public indifference are the two major obstacles in the way of checking the spread of dengue fever around the country, health officials say as dengue continues to rise ”

    2.  Authorities despair at public unconcern over dengue

Vaccine Trials

The Sunday Times in Sri Lanka 01/05/16 has reported that Sri Lanka has agreed to take part in field trials for a vaccine that has the potential to provide protection against all 4 strains of the dengue virus; great news which provides some hope for the future at last but clinical trials have recently begun and although early results are promising a vaccination could be years down the line. In there meantime….

Dengue fever is nasty. Just because it doesn’t kill that many people is no reason to ignore it or take a fatalistic view. People get sick, spend time off work, lose income and some plain die. It seems crazy that people have to be taken to court and fined before they will take simple steps to keep the mosquito at bay.

and one last thought; if a new vaccine becomes available will people stop taking the precautions, that some now ignore, altogether? Viruses typically mutate over time..

If Malaria can be effectively contained why not dengue?

Headline Image; credit: Ellen Forsyth

 

Waldringfield UK; a community led flood protection project

In 2013 a storm surge in the North Sea threatened communities up and down the East coast of the UK. Whilst many coastal settlements had benefited from flood protection schemes others like Waldringfield, a small village on the Deben estuary in Suffolk were left out of the loop and vulnerable. So when the surge came the inevitable result was flooding to the village.

Despite the flood there were no plans to put flood protection in place. Instead of taking a fatalistic view, however, the local community came together to raise the funds to create, not only an effective flood protection scheme (one of the first of its kind in the UK),  but at the same time create a nature reserve to enhance the local area. This case study is the story of how this project developed.

What is a storm surge?

Storms along the coast can cause sea levels to rise way above their normal level which leads to coastal flooding. So what causes a storm surge? The two diagrams taken from the UK Meteorological  Office site explain how this can happen.

  • A deep low pressure cell (depression) moves eastwards into the North Sea basin.
  • The low pressure at the centre of the storm “pulls” the water level up, by about 1 cm for every 1 millibar change in pressure.

europe - detailed

source: UK meteorological office

  • As the depression moves down the North Sea basin it generates high winds from a northerly direction. The winds push the sea water southwards and towards the coast, causing it to “pile up” along the coast, raising the sea level and creating a “surge”. This is a predictable event. The residents in Waldringfield knew 24 hours in advance that the surge was on its way, for example.
  • The strong winds in the storm generate large waves on top of the surge which can cause damage to sea defences, or spill over the top of sea walls adding to the flood risk.

europe - detailed

source: UK meteorological office

Introducing Waldringfield

Waldringfield is a small village on the west bank of the river Deben in Suffolk, on the East coast of the United Kingdom. The village comprises 225 houses with a population of 464 (2012). The village has a village hall, pub, boatyard and is home to Waldringfield Yacht Club.

The maps below show the location of Waldringfield in Suffolk and in the UK


                                                                                      waldringfieldlocation east coast

The 2013 Flood

On the 5 December, 2013 a large storm surge hit the east coast of the UK causing widespread flooding along the coast. This was a prime example of low pressure, high winds and high tidal conditions combining to create surge conditions;

  • It was the largest tidal surge since 1953 and water levels were actually higher than in 1953
  • Many East coast estuaries were flooded; The Stour, Deben and Orwell rivers all reported  flood damage.

Waldringfield is on the Deben estuary and suffered significant flooding on the river frontage. The following is the list of damage:

  • The river wall to the north of the village was overtopped, causing flooding of the meadow behind it.
  • The boatyard and about 18 residences on the Quay were also flooded to a depth of about 5 feet,  as well as several beach huts and land to the south of the village.
  • There was one casualty, who was taken to hospital by ambulance.
  • The fire service attended to a fire around 1.30am, which was caused by the flood water shorting the electric gates of a property on the Quay.
  • A heating oil tank and a gas tank floated off it stand, but, fortunately, remained attached to it feed pipes
  • The river wall was badly damaged in places, but it wasn’t breached.

The total cost of the damage and repairs was estimated to be: £10 million overall

The Waldringfield Flood Defence Group (WFDG)

The group got together informally 6 months prior to the flood. They were aware of the flood risk plus they were also aware that Waldringfield was not included in existing flood protection schemes for the Deben estuary. This was possibly because only 18 properties and the boat yard were at risk of flood at that time. (even though the real estate value of those properties is possibly above £20 million

Note: The village of Waldringfield  stretches about 1km inland from the river Deben and the majority of the village sits well above flood level. The lane known as The Quay is the  area liable most likely to flood in the village, see map below:

Waldringfield map cropped Page 1

When the flood occurred, and with no direct help from the government forthcoming, the 18 affected  households formed The Waldringfield Flood Defence Group (WFDG). It had significant support from a number of sources including: The Environment Agency, Suffolk Coastal District Council. The Deben Estuary Partnership, Waldringfield Parish Council, Lord Deben, Chairman of the UK’s Independent Committee on Climate Change, and the local MP, Dr Therese Coffey. Very quickly the group came up with a plan to create a two stage project for the immediate area area: this involved:

  1.  an outline plan for the design of new flood defences; including a raised sea wall 1km in length, flood gates, and movable flood barriers to protect the boatyard (completed within 3 months)
  2. the protection and preservation of a freshwater meadow and marshland habitat north of the village through the repair and strengthening of the river wall.
  3. restoration of  salt marsh which would add to the protection the sea wall.

Funding for the  £1million project was achieved mainly through grants,  including £633,000 from the Government’s Coastal Community Fund. The initial work on the salt marsh  was partly funded by the Suffolk Coast & Heaths Area of Outstanding Beauty unit.), and is visible at low tide.  A further 1,000m of protection is being funded by the Coastal Communities fund at a cost of £100,000

How do salt marshes protect flood defences?

Salt marshes play a major role in flood defence.  Salt marshes are effective buffers to wave action, by creating shallow water which reduces the power of waves. The wider the salt marsh the the more effective it is in protecting the sea wall. One study carried out at Cambridge University found that “salt marshes can reduce the height of damaging waves in storm surge conditions by close to 20%”

What has been achieved?

Stage 1: Raising the flood defences: protecting homes, businesses and jobs.

The live link will take you to the project page which details each step in the process. Stage 1 was completed in February 2015. The main points are as follows:

  • A new reinforced wall was built in front of the properties on The Quay at 3.5m OD. Each of the riverside properties now has its own steel reinforced gate to allow access to the footpath

DSC_0064

  • A  steel flood barrier was erected next to the boatyard. This can be closed by the Environment Agency in the event of a flood warning.
  • Removable steel barriers have been erected in the boatyard; they will be removed to allow boats  access to the river for launching but can be put in place in the event of a flood warning. (see below)

closable flood barrier removable flood barrier

Stage 2: Raising the river wall: repairing a footpath and creating a freshwater wildlife reserve

The live link will take you to the project page which details each step in the process. Stage 2 was completed in October 2015.

The main object of the scheme has been to create a wildlife reserve on a freshwater marsh area, which was formerly owned by the local vicar. When he died his executors agreed to allow the conversion of part of the farmland to a lagoon and nature reserve.

The lagoon area at present is bare.. it looks like a building site.. but it has been planted with sedges and within a few years it will naturalise to form an attractive habitat for birds and mammals, such as the water vole and a family of otters.

lagoon

see small scale map for location

After the flood there was concern over state of sea wall to north of village and the footpath which was also damaged when flood water overtopped the wall. So a decision was made to flatten the top of the wall and to widen the footpath.

The footpath is now much wider and more level as the photo below shows. Some locals probably feel that it is unnatural but access has been improved, and the path is accessible and usable all year. Access to the nature reserve will also be improved for locals and visitors alike.

footpath

the footpath looking north; now wider and flatter

Salt marsh restoration

The saltmarsh in front of the sea wall to the north of the village varies in width. Immediately north of the village it is quite degraded; see below but widens out . The WFDG scheme allows for the installation of brushwood  fences which have been installed in the marsh in front of the sea wall. The hope is that these fences will trap sediment on the outgoing tide and help to build up the marsh in front of the sea wall to add some degree of additional protection to the sea wall and the footpath. There remains another 1000 metres of fencing to install to complete the job.

degraded marsh

the degraded salt marsh

brushwood fences

brushwood fences in place to protect the sea wall

Local community action: is this the way forward?

This scheme is the first of its kind so far as I can tell and The Environment Agency is keen to use this project as a pilot to demonstrate how local communities projects such as this one can be the forerunner for other schemes which fall outside of government support.

  1.  The WFDG were successful because:
  • they were already organized
  • they had the necessary skills to produce a fully drawn up and costed project plan
  • they had the skills to lobby for financial support
  • they acted quickly
  • they worked together and without internal wrangling/disagreement

2.  The value of the community based approach was that they designed it themselves and so it was fit for their purpose; basically they got what they wanted but also created a scheme with significant utility and value to the village as a whole.

3.  At the same time they turned it into a multi purpose project by:

  • protecting the sea wall
  • creating a much more accessible and usable footpath alongside the river, an improved amenity for all
  • working with the estate of the recently deceased vicar to create the wildlife reserve which will be of broad ecological value but also will provide a real amenity to be enjoyed by locals and visitors and will add to the attractiveness of the riverside

I recently interviewed Janette Brown, the secretary of the Waldringfield Flood Defence Group and started by asking her to take us back to the night of the flood. You can listen to the full interview here:

Saving mangrove forests; Sri Lanka takes a lead role

 

“It is the responsibility and the necessity of all…to be united to protect the mangrove ecosystem.” – President Sirisena

How refreshing it is to see that Sri Lanka is leading the world in the conservation of its mangrove forests.

Two N.G.O.’s Seacology and Sudeesa (formerly known as Small Fishers Federation of Lanka) alongside the government of Sri Lanka have just announced a US$ 3.4 million project set to run until 2020 aimed at

  • protecting all 8,815 ha of Sri Lanka’s existing mangrove forests.
  • replanting an additional 9,600 acres (3,885 ha) in areas where mangroves have been cut down.
  • establishing three mangrove nurseries to promote replanting efforts.
Where are the mangrove forests?

mangrove-4-638

There are three main areas of mangrove forest:

  1. The west coast; between Kalpitiya and Colombo
  2. The South coast especially between Kalutara and Galle
  3. The East coast from Batticaloa all the way along towards Jaffna
Threats

74% of mangrove forests have been lost in Sri Lanka since the 19th century.  30 years ago there were over 40,000 ha. of mangrove, now there are just 8000…most of it  been destroyed due to commercial exploitation and firewood use.as well as the impacts of the war that raged from 1983 to 2009.  It seems that most of the damage is in the past and was due to:

  1. prawn farming
  2. collateral damage from the civil war
  3. poor communities particularly along the East coast relied on mangrove  forest as a source of firewood

Today those threats remain plus:

  • clearance for tourist developments and hotel complexes

bulldozing.mangroves

  • coastal urban development more generally
  • pollution from agricultural chemicals
Why protect the mangroves?

Mangroves are trees and shrubs that grow in brackish and saline water along tropical and sub- tropical shorelines. Mangroves’ stilted roots are anchored in underwater sediment and extend above the surface.

Mangroves

They are biologically rich ecosystems  and are hauntingly beautiful but their value goes way beyond the aesthetic.

Mangroves are very productive ecosystems  (on a par with tropical rain forest) with an economic value globally estimated to be more than US$ 186 million annually (according to the World Wildlife Fund. Why?

  • Fisheries: Mangrove forests are not only home to a large variety of fish, crab, shrimp, and mollusc species, which form an essential source of food for thousands of coastal communities around the world. They are also nurseries for many fish species, including coral reef fish.  This makes mangrove forests vitally important to  commercial fisheries as well.
  • Timber and plant products: Mangrove wood is resistant to rot and insects, making it extremely valuable. Many coastal  communities rely on this wood for construction material as well as for fuel. These communities also collect medicinal plants from mangrove ecosystems and use mangrove leaves as animal fodder. Recently, the forests have also been commercially harvested for pulp, wood chip, and charcoal production.
  • Coastal protection: The dense root systems of mangrove forests trap sediments flowing down rivers and off the land. This helps stabilizes the coastline and prevents erosion from waves and storms. In areas where mangroves have been cleared, coastal damage from hurricanes and typhoons is much more severe. When the 2004 Tsunami hit Sri Lanka the mangroves played an important role in slowing down the waves and giving people time to escape to safer ground. By filtering out sediments, the forests also protect coral reefs and seagrass meadows from being smothered in sediment.
  • Tourism: The huge diversity of species is becoming increasingly attractive to tourists who are looking for more than just sun sea and sand based holidays
  • Carbon Sink: It is now estimated that the mangrove forests play an important role in absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere (carbon sequestration) . This is not just because of the large biomass of the forests. The forests are very efficient and transferring carbon to the soil.

“the .. implication of this is that the long term sequestration of carbon by 1kmsq of mangrove is equivalent to that occurring in 50kmsq of tropical forest”

Dr Emily Pidgeon: Conservation International

So if countries are serious about limiting carbon emissions the last thing they should be thinking of is removing their mangrove forests.

Sri Lanka leads the way

The Sri Lanka Mangrove Conservation project is being run by California based NGO Seacology alongside SUDEESA (formerly known as Small Fishers Federation of Lanka) and the government of Sri Lanka.

The $3.4million project aims to:

  • Protect all 21,782 acres (8,815 ha) of Sri Lanka’s existing mangrove forests.
  • Replant an additional 9,600 acres (3,885 ha) in areas where mangroves have been cut down.
  • Establish three mangrove nurseries to promote replanting efforts.

sri-lanka-wetland-plants

The way it works is that if a village agrees to create or enforce a forest or marine reserve, Seacology will fund a key community need, such as a school or health clinic.

Putting women in charge is at the heart of the scheme. They will protect mangroves by ensuring no one in their communities, or from outside, cuts down the trees. If persuasion does not work they will be able to alert the authorities who are providing legislative support.

“We have discovered that if you want a project to succeed, have the women of the community run it,” said Anuradha Wickramasinghe, chairman of the Sri Lankan NGO Sudeesa. “Other conservation organisations have found the same thing.”

Where local communities agree to participate, the project will provide alternative job training and microloans to 15,000 poor women and their families, who live in 1,500 small communities adjacent to this nation’s mangrove forests.  In exchange for receiving these microloans to start up small businesses, all 1,500 communities will be responsible for protecting an average of 21 acres of mangrove forest. A first-of-its kind mangrove museum to educate the public about the importance of preserving this resource will also be constructed as part of this project.

Dual benefits

It is significant that the focus will be on women and the belief is that empowering women within the communities living close to the mangrove forests will have a major impact in raising living standards.

Sri Lanka’s emerging tourist industry can also benefit. Mangroves offer a new wildlife alternative for tourists; maybe to take some of the pressure off the heavily visited (over visited) national parks such as Yala

For too long mangroves have been seen simply as a wasteland to be cut down or removed to make way for commercial development but there is emerging a new more enlightened view and with it the hope that Sri Lanka’s existing mangrove forest can be protected and enhanced for future generations.

references and links:

local community involvement

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/gallery/2016/jul/26/mangroves-and-incomes-flourish-as-sri-lankas-women-promote-conservation-in-pictures

https://www.seacology.org/project/sri-lanka-mangrove-conservation-project/

Sampoor Power Station; dead in the water? environmental impact case study

The Ministry of Power and Renewable Energy has decided not to go ahead with the construction of the Sampur Coal Power plant, see Daily Mirror report 14/09 in what many will see as a victory for environmentalists. 

In November 2015 The Sunday Times also reported that the new power plant earmarked for Sampur near Trincomalee was a non starter. The main reasons given were that:

  • the plant has failed to meet the Environmental Impact Assessment criteria laid down
  • Sampur has been earmarked for 800 returning IDP Tamil families (internally displaced persons) who do not wish to see a large power station built on land so close to them.

On the face of it you can see why.

The Sampur plant

The proposal is to build a 500 megawatt coal fired power station on the east coast at Sampur across the bay from Trincomalee.

Trincomalee.8

Trincomalee: Location

SM71812

source: Ministry of Power

The power station is proposed to be built on 500 acres of land currently sectioned off as a high security zone by the Sri Lankan Navy but was formerly land belonging to the local Tamil population driven from their lands during the final months of the war which ended in 2009.

It will be a joint venture with the National Thermal Power Company of India using low grade coal imported from India.

The Case against 
  1. Damage to the marine environment of Shell Bay: Shell Bay is home to 56 hard coral species, 160 of coral associated fish species and many other invertebrates including the rare giant clam. The Mahaweli Ganga ( river) also exits to the sea nearby bringing a high nutrient concentration and all these factors contribute to make Trincomalee Bay a unique ecosystem with high biodiversity ranging from tiny organisms to large whales.

1357318175_0!!-!!Hikkaduwa coral reef

Negative impacts will likely include the following:

  • when operational the discharge of cooling water from the power station will raise the water temperature of Shell Bay by 4 degrees celsius; sufficient to result in bleaching of the coral which will then die
  • contamination of the water from sulphur. and mercury as a result of the burning of coal
  • chlorine  will be used to clean the water and if discharged without treating, it can first impact on tiny organisms like planktons and can have a major impact on the food chain

2. Air Pollution

If the plant uses imported Indian coal (coal with a high ash content) then engineers suggest that significant amounts of air pollution will occur locally resulting in:

  • acid rain (from nitrogen oxide and sulphur oxide  carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide being pumped into the atmosphere)
  • significant amounts of ash/dust particles and unburnt hydro carbons which can cause lung damage
  • ash and sludge which will have to be buried in large landfill sites

3.  Social Issues

The new government have already begun the proceed of resettling tamil families back into the Sampur area and, as the Sunday Times recently pointed out:

“the unfavourable impact of a coal power plant has been a major worry for the people who are waiting to come back to their land in Sampur. They fear their precious agricultural lands are contaminated and the air they breathe would be polluted.” ...

… not without reason you might think.

It is also suggested in some areas that the land set aside for the plant in fact belongs to displaced families and so should not be used for industrial development.

4.  Political Issues

  • The Tamil National Alliance are firmly against the project and see this ( the high security zone) as an a attempt to keep out the Tamil population. They allege:

” a hidden agenda to the project to permanently evict Tamils from the Muttur east region.”

  • The restoration of lands taken from the Tamils features high on the agenda of many external governments,
  • At the same time  Sri Lanka is under pressure from foreign governments to show it is making progress in this aspect of post war reconciliation and in the field of human rights

So for these reasons it was politically expedient to reconsider siting the plant at Sampur.

5.  Power exports

Some of the power would have been sent via a new grid to Southern India; Sri Lanka would not get the full benefit of the new generating capacity although it would suffer all of the disadvantages outlined above.

So you might think the case against is overwhelming. But it is not that simple

The Case For
  1.  Sri Lanka needs power

The Sri Lankan economy is growing at around 7% annually; fairly impressive when compared to the  low growth economies of the developed world. However, continued growth in the manufacturing and business sector is going to drive up energy demand, particularly electricity demand. Some are even predicting that Sri Lanka will be in energy deficit by 2017.

current projections (see page 282) suggest that electricity demand is likely to increase by around 5% per annum but meeting this target may prove difficult and expensive given that the Island is not self sufficient in terms of energy production.

The country has no domestic production of coal, crude oil, or natural gas, and as a result all the fossil fuel demand is met through imports.

At the moment that means oil which now accounts for just over 50% of power generation.

BUT relying on oil-fired power comes at a heavy price pushing up the cost of electricity to the consumer.

(How lucky then that the recent fall in oil prices allowed the government to reduce electricity prices and the cost of petrol.. trouble is it won’t last. Prices will go up again!)

Sri Lanka needs to move from a dependence on imported oil is an urgent issue for Sri Lanka’s power sector to address, but options are limited:

  • hydro electric power is already at close to full capacity
  • nuclear power as an option is not under serious consideration yet and in any case would be way too expensive and take too long to get up and running
  • solar/wind/geothermal/wave power; are all in their infancy

Which means the only viable option for developing large “base line” energy supplies in the short term, is to build new coal fired power stations.

So far one major plant has been built on the west coast at Norochchalai which will generate around 17% of Sri Lanka’s energy.

 

Noracholai_3

The Norochchalai  Power Plant

However it won’t be enough; That is why the Government entered into an agreement with  to build a large 500 mega watt power plant at Sampur near Trincomalee.

2. Cost:

It is argued that the current site incurs the lowest development cost; environmental protection and pollution mitigation measures plus consideration of alternative site would add to the cost already standing at $512 million

3.  Politics

The the Sri Lankan government agreed to partner an Indian company in the development of this power project. It has already “disappointed” the Indian authorities by not co-building the Norochchalai complex with them but going with the Chinese design and build. Reneging on this agreement could further damage relations between the two countries

Something has to happen

The question is: what happens now? Sri Lanka cannot build sustainable economic growth on the back of rising oil imports, nor can it squeeze more energy from existing renewables like HEP.

Nuclear power is not an option either.

That leaves wind and solar as alternatives, unless of course the government simply decide to build a coal fired plant somewhere else (maybe less environmentally sensitive?)

The energy clock is ticking and if the plant is not going to be built in Sampur, energy will have to come from another source; and with major growth projects such as the Megapolis plan for Western Province already under way the decision on how to generate more energy needs to come soon.

 

 

Welcome to Geo Sri Lanka: case studies for A level geographers

Hi, my name is Phil Brighty. The title for the blog Geosrilanka comes from the fact that I lived and worked in Colombo  for nearly 7 years, and came to really love the country and its people. You will find case studies focussed on geographical  issues in a developing country: Sri Lanka. Up until recently South Asia has been a neglected are for study; however, it is a rich area for study geographically and,  just as importantly, offers new material for students. As a teacher I was always on the lookout  to get away from the same old examples everyone uses…which is why I set up this blog. I hope you find the case studies useful.

List of articles; click on this link to see the full range of  articles

Dengue in Sri Lanka:  Dengue fever in Sri Lanka is reaching epidemic proportions: check out the latest Dengue update.

Apart from Geosrilanka I write mainly for for GeoFactsheets.. However, I have also published in The Geographical Review, and Geofile Online.

Before that I was Head of Geography at The Sixth Form College Colchester and then was based at Colombo International School as HOD and Head of Secondary School. In the past I have been an A level examiner for OCR, AQA and also an examiner for IB diploma geography.

 Fieldwork in Sri Lanka;

Sri Lanka is a great place to undertake fieldwork for A level geography..most places are accessible and value for money; plus for students it can be the trip of a lifetime because with careful planning they get to experience what regular tourists never can:

If you are interested click on the live link above to find out more..

Feedback; would love to have some

What would be interesting to know is how people are using the case studies..are students being referred to the site? are teachers using them in class or as research and prep for lessons?

The blogs are very much summaries of often large numbers of links, websites etc. If anyone wants to know more, wants help with resources, especially with Sri Lanka in mind, then I would be happy to respond.

There is an opportunity to comment so do send comments in and I will put them up.

Stop Press: Just added

Making sense of the Sri Lankan monsoon

Dengue Update; dengue cases could top 150,000 this year!

Colombo Garbage Dump Collapse

The Indian Ocean Monsoon part 1: is the monsoon becoming less predictable?

Plus 2 articles have been updated

Dengue Update

Challenges ahead for the Sri Lankan Garment Industry

more… 

Next Up: 

The Monsoon, Drought and Global Warming in Sri Lanka; prospects and problems